Gail Therriault | Jaffrey Real Estate, Rindge Real Estate, Peterborough Real Estate


A home seller may dread the thought of dealing with an aggressive property buyer, i.e. an individual who submits many requests for property improvements or price reductions prior to the closing of a home sale. Fortunately, we're here to help you take the guesswork out of dealing with an aggressive homebuyer.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to help a home seller get the best-possible results when he or she deals with an aggressive property buyer.

1. Keep Your Cool

Let's face it – an aggressive homebuyer may test your patience. But if you remain calm, cool and collected when you deal with an aggressive homebuyer, you may be better equipped than ever before to accomplish your desired home selling results.

Remember, the ultimate goal of the house selling journey is to maximize your property sale earnings. If you remain open to communication with a buyer, both you and this individual can work together to find common ground. And as a result, you and a buyer can collaborate to achieve the optimal results.

2. Know Your Options

If a buyer makes exorbitant requests during the home selling journey, it is important to keep in mind that you have options. And if problems start to escalate, you may be able to walk away from a property selling agreement.

For example, if an aggressive buyer conducts a home inspection and asks for a massive price reduction following the evaluation, you can still negotiate with this buyer. And if you and the buyer cannot come to terms, there is no need to stress. At this point, you can move on from a potential home sale and re-list your residence.

3. Hire a Real Estate Agent

Dealing with an aggressive homebuyer can be worrisome. For sellers who want to avoid the potential dangers associated with dealing with an aggressive buyer, it may be beneficial to hire a real estate agent.

In addition to guiding you along the property selling journey, a real estate agent is happy to help you negotiate with a buyer and his or her agent. That way, you can boost the likelihood of enjoying a quick, profitable house selling experience.

Typically, a real estate agent will serve as a liaison between you and a buyer. And if a buyer requests property upgrades or a price reduction prior to closing day, a real estate agent can offer recommendations about how to proceed with these requests.

A real estate agent also is available to respond to any of your home selling concerns or questions. This housing market professional understands the property selling experience can cause a seller to worry, especially if this individual is forced to deal with an aggressive buyer. But with a real estate agent's assistance, a seller can take the necessary steps to minimize potential property selling hurdles.

Simplify a negotiation with an aggressive homebuyer – use the aforementioned tips, and any home seller can seamlessly navigate a negotiation with any buyer, at any time.



 

Generally, a closet ought to bring simplicity to your life. Whether it's a large walk-in or an itty-bitty space, a neat closet should be where you can get the things you need any time of the day. However, keeping a closet neat and organized can be more complicated than it seems. One day you have a clean closet that makes you hum James Brown's "I feel good." The next day the closet looks like a sharp gust of wind swept through it. No worries. Erase your closet headaches with these excellent tips.


Remove What You Don’t Need

Take your time to go through every single item in your closet, and discard anything you have not worn in a year or so. You could always donate to your local shelters or clothing drives visiting your community.

Save with Hanging Organizers

If there is no space for shelves or a dresser in your closet, try using hanging organizers to save more space. They are inexpensive and will provide an ideal place to put your folded clothes.

Hang Items on the Inside of the Door

For those that don't have sliding doors, you can add hooks to the inside of your closet door to hang items like scarves, handbags, and jewelry.

Store Out-of-Season Items

If you live in an area that is particular to season changes, storing your clothing from the prior season could free up some of your space. Check for any out-of-season clothes and neatly fold them into a bin or utilize space-saving bags to keep any critters, dust or unwanted things from getting to them. Bin's and saver bags are easy to stack and can fit neatly under your bed or in a corner in your closet.

Add a Light

Some closets come with light, while others may not. If your closet does not have a light fixture, you could easily add one. You may wish to use a preexisting light feature from another area of your home, such as free-standing lamp, or simply use a wall-mounted lamp to give your closet a little more illumination. If you opt for in-depth installation, there are a few key points to remember when it comes to choosing your bulb, such as halogen lights not typically being suitable for small, enclosed spaces due to the heat they give off. Instead, make use of fluorescent or LED options. They're energy efficient and give off minimal heat. Being able to see your things will help you keep them in order.

Store Your Shoes Elsewhere

If your closet has limited floor space, you can store your shoes in a bin under your bed, or in an over-the-door, hanging organizer on your closet or bedroom door. Both are relatively inexpensive and save a tremendous amount of space. If you prefer to do it yourself, there are ample ideas to search for such as recycled PVC shoe holders or repurposing old display furniture, like bookshelves.

Follow these simple tips, and you could save endless amounts of space in your closet. You can then use your well-designed closet as a great home feature to entice new buyers. Talk to your real estate agent about the most popular closet layouts and how to set yours up for an open house. 

Image by Wokandapix from Pixabay

The equity in your home plays a major role in how much profit you'll make off the sale, but it's not always simple to determine just how much of the home you own (even if you haven't refinanced). Here are a few tips to understand equity and how you can use it to your advantage.  

What Is Home Equity?

The simplest definition is that home equity is the difference between the market value and your current loan amount. When calculating, you should also take into account related financing (e.g., home improvement loans, second mortgages, etc.). If you owe more on the home than you owe, you have negative home equity.

Of course, the number you generate is just an estimate. Just because your market value is listed at a certain price, doesn't mean that a buyer will offer that amount. Overall though, it's a good place to start. Once you have a baseline, it can give you a better idea of how your home sale will go and what you can afford once you move out.  

The Bottom Line  

Let's say you bought a home for $150,000 and you've paid off $50,000 total. If your home was recently assessed at $400,000, then your home equity is now $300,000, even though you only owe $100,000. The longer you've owned your home, the more you'll pay toward equity as opposed to interest. 

But home sale profits aren't the same as home equity. You also have to deduct any expenses associated with selling the home, including staging, listing and real estate agent fees. This can take as much as 10% off the total sale price. Some lenders will charge a penalty fee for paying off the loan early, so you'll need to check your contract to understand your responsibilities. 

Equity and the Home Sale

Experts recommend having at least 10% equity in a home if they're making a lateral move. So if you need to relocate for your job and you're planning to move into a similar home, then you'll need less than someone who's upgrading their lifestyle. If you want a bigger and more luxurious home, it helps to have at least 15% — and preferably more. The less equity you have, the more likely you'll end up with negative equity. 

Equity can be confusing because you ultimately own the home while you're paying the mortgage payments. Your lender is simply using the value of the property as a type of collateral in case of default. You can think of equity as a form of leverage you can use to give you a little more confidence during the sale. 


One of the worst mistakes you can make when looking for a new home is to allow yourself to become discouraged. Once that happens, your energy level drops, your optimism wavers, and your standards slide.

Searching for just the right house for you and your family may take longer than you expect, but success is often right around the corner! In the mean time, persistence and mental focus will help you get past the rough spots and detours. If you decide to work with a real estate buyers' agent, they will help keep you motivated, encouraged, and updated on new listings.

Although a certain amount of flexibility is necessary when you're in the market for a new home, there are advantages to having a clear picture in your mind of what you're looking for. There are a lot of factors that can play a role in your degree of happiness and comfort in a new home, and it's vital to recognize exactly what those key features and characteristics would be.

Here are a few things to mull over as you visit homes for sale and compare the pluses and minuses of each.

  • Location: In addition to seeking out a neighborhood that's convenient for shopping, commuting, and meeting your family's needs, it also pays to keep investment value in mind. While nobody can look into a crystal ball and say with absolute certainty that property values will increase in the foreseeable future, there are educated guesses and projections that can be made based on trends and available data. An experienced real estate agent can be one of your best resources in determining whether a neighborhood is growing or declining. Very often there are telltale signs that are worth paying close attention to when evaluating different homes for sale.
  • Architectural style: While many house hunters are only interested in features like square footage, lot size, and the quality of the school district, you may have preferences for specific architectural styles. Finding a house that conforms to your architectural preferences can make a big difference in your level of satisfaction. Although there are more than thirty different styles from which to choose, many people lean toward Colonial houses, Craftsman style homes, Contemporaries, Ranch houses, Tudors, Victorians (Queen Anne, for example), Cape Cods, Art Deco houses, Split Levels, and Bungalows. Other style possibilities include Dutch Colonials, Georgian-style houses, and Spanish-influenced architectures , such as the Monterey, Spanish Eclectic, and Pueblo. While some styles tend to be mostly confined to certain areas of the country, most communities have a wide array of architectural styles available to home buyers.
  • Condition of the Home: Some of a house's flaws are easy to spot, while others may require the expertise of a certified house inspector. The extent to which you're willing to make repairs, updates, and renovations to a new home will be one key factor that will determine which house is best for your needs, goals, and budget.
There are literally dozens of features, characteristics, and quality standards to keep in mind when shopping for a new home, but location, structural condition, and style are three factors that are well worth including on your priority list.

This Single-Family in Rindge, NH recently sold for $44,000. This style home was sold by Gail Therriault - HKS Associates, Inc..


4 Pearly Pond Way, Rindge, NH 03461

Single-Family

$52,000
Price
$44,000
Sale Price

1
Bedrooms
3
Rooms
1
Baths
Small one bedroom cottage with historical rights to Pearly Pond just across the highway. Perfect for single person. Cottage has a small living room, large kitchen and good sized bedroom with shower bath. Located on a small corner lot. Heated by fuel. Serviced by a dug well and a 1250 gallon fiberglass septic tank. There is a dock in the water for use by owner of the cottage. Could be a summer getaway. Rustic but serviceable. Listing agent is related to seller.






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